Wandering – Yorkshire and Haworth, England


yorkshire

Hello and greetings from England!  You might be surprised to hear from me, but I have not completely given up on blogging!  Even though it may seem like I have.  (WordPress reminds me that it has been 8 months since my last blog post.)  Now that the weather is getting colder, the days shorter, and the nights longer – I think it’s a good time to start up again.  We have had some nice travels this year, the biggest being a trip through Europe, to Rome and back, with our caravan for six weeks this fall.  I have plenty of stories and tales to tell from that trip but first I will start of with the most recent outing in England while it is still fresh in my memory.

chimney

Early in November we drove to Manchester airport to pick up my American friend who came to visit for 10 days.  She had not been to York so we made plans to spend the first few days up that way.  The scenery was great driving across the country and we drove through some towns and villages I would have loved to have spent some time exploring.  But we needed to stay focused and get to York before dark if possible.  And that is getting earlier and earlier this time of year.  One of those towns we would like to have spent some time seeing was Hebden Bridge, shown in these first two photos, where we paused just for a brief view of the landscape and chimney tops and with hopes to return again another time.

telephone

Our first planned stop was at the village of Haworth.  A pub lunch and refreshments at the Haworth Old Hall Inn had just the kind of warm welcome and comforting food one needs on a wet and dreary English day.

pub

If you are a fan of the writings of the Bronte Sisters you will know that Haworth was where they lived and wrote their famous works.  A sunny day would have been nice, but the rainy and cloudy weather added to the atmosphere and the feeling like we had gone back in time to the days and scenes of Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre.

haworth

Haworth is a very charming village on it’s own and is well worth a visit.  The many shops and cafes provide a good diversion, as you are climbing up the steep cobblestone street and take time to pause occasionally for a view of the countryside in the distance.

catandcafe

bookshop

sweet shop

shops

apothecary

You see, very charming and atmospheric, history has been well preserved here.

village

When you get to the top of the hill,  you make a turn and climb just a bit further to the church and the old school house.

church and school

The church of St. Michael and All Angels of which Patrick Bronte was the parson on the right and the school house on the left.  Just try to imagine the car in the picture is a horse and carriage.

church bench

The side of the church with a bench for resting and reflection, and below inside the church.

church interior

A sign on the entrance to the Old School Room which says it was built by Patrick Bronte for the children of Haworth.  Charlotte, Bramwell and Emily all taught here.  Site of Charlotte’s wedding reception in 1854.

Old School

Looking across the churchyard to the parsonage with the school on the right.

scene

The Old Parsonage where the Bronte family, Patrick, Maria and their six children moved to in 1820.  The dining room inside is where Charlotte, Emily and Anne did most of their writing including Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre and Agnes Grey.  We did not go in, but the Old Parsonage is now a museum where you can tour the home and learn more about the Bronte family.

parsonage

The museum sign and a few photos inside the book and gift shop.

sign

Are you a fan of the writings of the Bronte sisters?  I do admit I would like to learn more about them and hopefully return sometime to tour the Old Parsonage.  I have admiration for their writing in the fact that it is still talked about and read over 150 years later.  Especially as I struggle to write a simple blog post in some cohesive manner.

books

When you hear the name Heathcliff it is automatically associated with Wuthering Heights.

heathcliffe

A view across the rooftops and the moors from beside the parsonage. Which must be very close to the view the Bronte sisters had all those years ago.

For you Americans – Have a Happy Thanksgiving!!  I will be thinking of you!!

moors

 

 

 

 

Categories: EnglandTags: , , , , ,

8 comments

  1. Welcome Back ! Great to see your post in my inbox – we’ve missed you…
    Enjoyed this post so much – the photos are wonderful ! I would love to visit Haworth – you captured it beautifully…

  2. Hi Jane! Beautiful photos. I’ve read those books many years ago! Happy Thanksgiving to you!

    Sent from my iPhone

  3. Hi Jane,

    I’ve missed your posts and have really enjoyed reading this one. Looking forward to more.

    My kids arrive today and will stay until Sunday so things will be busy here what with getting Thanksgiving dinner and keeping up with the grandkids.

    Stay safe in this crazy world! Love to you and John.

    Gail

    >

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